Simple, Versatile Pesto

I’ve loved pesto since the first time I tasted it.  As the years have gone by I’ve made quite a few versions of my own.  I’ve made traditional pesto.  I’ve made red pepper and sun-dried tomato pesto.  And I’ve made very simple pesto.

pesto pasta

I’ve added new ingredients.  I’ve taken things out when I had various dietary restrictions.  And I finally settled on my base pesto recipe that only takes about 2 minutes to make.  I’ve removed the allergens (dairy and nuts) as well so just about anybody can eat it.

Pesto is so versatile.  You can use whatever greens you have fresh or frozen.  And you can use it in so many dishes.  Here are a few ways to use pesto.

  • Pizza sauce – Replace your usual tomato sauce with pesto and top with chicken and vegetables.  With all the flavor from the pesto you can even skip the cheese and make a delicious dairy free pizza.
  • Salad dressing – Store-bought dressings are almost always made with unhealthy vegetable oils.  Whip up a batch of pesto and you’ve got easy, flavorful dressing on hand for the whole week.
  • Rice – Rice can get pretty boring.  Liven it up with a few spoonfuls of pesto.  Add a little parmesan cheese and cooked chicken and you’ve got a whole meal!
  • Vegetable topping – Mix pesto into a bowl of roasted vegetables or pureed squash or pumpkin.
  • Quiche – Spread a layer of pesto on a pie crust.  Top it with a mixture of eggs, milk and cheese and bake.
  • Snack – Need a quick bite of something healthy in-between meals?  Try a spoon or two of pesto.  You’ll get easy to digest nutrients and healthy fat.
  • Baby food – Who says baby’s need bland food?  Let your little one try some.  No need to chew
  • Bread – Make your favorite yeast bread dough.  Roll it out.  Spread pesto on top.  Roll the dough into a loaf and bake.  You’ll have a homemade bread with pesto swirled throughout.
  • Pasta – Cook some pasta, drain most of the liquid, stir in pesto.  Top it with cheese and/or add cooked chicken or bacon if desired.  Or mix the pesto into your favorite alfredo sauce to make pesto-fredo pasta.
  • Panini – Use pesto as the dressing on a Panini.
  • Soup – Mix pesto into a bowl of homemade chicken noodle soup, squash soup or white chili.  It’s a great twist on your favorite soups.
  • Dip – Dip raw vegetables into plain pesto.  Or you can mix pesto with hummus to make a “pummus” dip.

Do you like pesto?  What is your favorite way to use it?

pesto pizza

Simple, Versatile Pesto
Author: 
 
Makes 2½ cups
Ingredients
  • 2 cups frozen (thawed) or fresh peas, spinach, broccoli, kale, chard, basil or any other green/herb you like (you can use a combination as well)
  • ½ - 1 cup extra virgin olive oil (you can replace some of it with water for a ighter version or to make it have a more neutral flavor)
  • unrefined sea salt and garlic powder to taste
Method of Preparation
  1. Blend greens, ½ cup olive oil, salt and garlic powder in a blender or food processor until smooth.
  2. Add extra olive oil or water to reach desired consistency.
  3. Adjust seasoning to taste.

 

Mary Voogt is a follower of Christ, a wife, and a mother of two. After 6 years as an electrical engineer she now stays home full time. She is passionate about real food and enjoys spending lots of time in the kitchen cooking and baking from scratch. She blogs at Homemade Dutch Apple Pie on a variety of topics including digestive issues, OCD, anxiety, infertility, natural parenting and healthy food.

When It’s Cold Outside Get Crafty Inside

I’ll be honest.  I’m not a fan of cold weather.  I’ve lived in Michigan my entire life.  But I still don’t like the cold.

I do believe it’s healthy to get outside as much as you can…so we do.  But it’s also nice sometimes to stay inside.  So as soon as the weather gets cooler I’m looking for fun indoor activities.

Around here that means it’s time to get crafty.  Here are some easy fall crafts and activities to do with your kids or by yourself!

  1. Paint with fruits and vegetables – Slice any fruit or vegetable to use as a stamp.  You get all different shapes and sizes.  Plus you can use up produce that is getting old.
  2. Make placemats with wax paper – Use leaves or color a picture and place them between two pieces of wax paper.  Iron the paper until both sides stick together.  Trim the edges.
  3. Make all of your fall/Thanksgiving decorations from nature – Go on a scavenger hunt in your yard or a local park to find sticks, pine-cones, leaves, rocks, etc.  Then get creative making decorations with them.
  4. Make Christmas cards and gifts – It may be early for some, but if you start making cards and gifts now you’ll be less stressed when Christmas approaches.  Plus you’ll have unique, heartfelt, homemade gifts for your friends and family.  Homemade baked goods and spice blends make great presents, as do crafts that you and your children create.
  5. Paint pottery – Find a local paint-your-own pottery studio (like Naked Plates) and create your own masterpiece.  This is a great thing to do with your kids.  Make a serving dish together and use it at all of your holiday gatherings.  Your kids will be so proud.
  6. Make Halloween costumes – There’s still time!  Instead of spending a lot of money to buy a costume, let your kids help make their own.  See how creative you can be using what you have at home.  Is that a fairy princess chef I see?
  7. Recreate the first Thanksgiving – Have your kids help make pilgrim and Indian costumes.  Read about the first Thanksgiving and put on a play.  You can even make a mini feast of what they may have eaten.
  8. Make a countdown chain – Make paper chains to count down to Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Then let your kids cut one ring off each day.
  9. Make art with food…and eat it! – Provide an assortment of sliced fruits, vegetables, nuts, crackers and dips (nut butters, pesto, hummus, etc.) and let your child get creative.  Make a picture on a plate (maybe a face or an animal or even something abstract).  Then eat it!  You can take a picture to capture their creation.
  10. Write a book – Help your child write their own book.  Fold blank paper.  Let them create a story.  If they are young you can write the story as they tell it.  If they are older they can write it themselves.  Then they can illustrate it.  After the book is finished read it together…over and over.  It’s a great way to help them be creative.

Fall is a wonderful time to be outside, breathe the crisp air and see the beauty of nature.  But it’s also a great time to be creative with your kids inside.  It doesn’t have to cost a lot or take a lot of time to stir their imagination and spend quality time together.  Plus you can get some of your holiday preparation done in advance.

What sort of fun activities do you do indoors once the weather becomes cooler?

Mary Voogt is a follower of Christ, a wife, and a mother of two. After 6 years as an electrical engineer she now stays home full time. She is passionate about real food and enjoys spending lots of time in the kitchen cooking and baking from scratch. She blogs at Homemade Dutch Apple Pie on a variety of topics including digestive issues, OCD, anxiety, infertility, natural parenting and healthy food.

Let’s Make a Deal! Garage Sale Tips

garage sale tips

photo credit: johnbeagle

It’s that time of year again! Yard sale signs are starting to show up and I am getting giddy with anticipation.

My family relies on yard sales and thrift stores for a majority of our purchases including clothing, appliances, bedding, and furniture.

I enjoy shopping, but with my focus being on simple living and paying down our student loans I definitely don’t think of shopping the same way as I used to. And I have found a few tips that have made yard sale-ing more fun and even more affordable.

Tips and Tricks for Garage Sale-ing

1. Wear pants that have several pockets. Have a certain amount in cash in each pocket. For example, your right front pocket will have $18 cash, your left front pocket will have $13 cash, and so on. When you go to pay for your $20 purchase pull the money out of your right front pocket and offer them the $18 cash. Most of the time people will take less, especially when you whip it out in that exact amount.

2. Always try to barter down on prices of big ticket items. Decide ahead of time what you are willing to pay and if they won’t come down be prepared to walk away. If they have a $200 item and you’re willing to pay $175 for it, then offer them $150 and see if they counteroffer.

3. Shop neighborhood sales. I LOVE shopping neighborhood sales because I can park my car once, unload my kids in our double jogger and then walk up and down the street. If I buy a big item I just ask them to set it aside and I’ll come back through and pick it up at the end. If you do this be sure to keep a list of what houses you need to stop back by so you don’t forget any of your purchases. It might be wise to have the person you’ve bought it from put your name and cell phone number on it just in case. Shopping neighborhood sales saves on gas as well since you can hit several different sales with one stop.

[Read more…]



All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

This blog is for educational purposes only. The information provided by Donielle, or any contributor, is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you are seeking medical advice, please search out a qualified health practitioner.

Downsizing a Home

My husband and I have a dream to homestead.

We want a farmhouse, some land, and a barn. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, but a place for us to grow our own food and keep some animals.

downsizing your home

photo credit: mckaysavage

In order for us to afford to do this we had to sell our home and downsize significantly to pay down some debt. So two years ago we went from a large 4 bedroom, 2 bath home on just under 2 acres to a 2 bedroom single wide mobile home in a trailer park. It was a huge change and we had to make a lot of sacrifices to make it work.

Cleaning House

I had to start out by getting rid of stuff we didn’t need, or didn’t use often enough, to warrant keeping. This part of the process was very hard to do as I had to get rid of some of my favorite furniture pieces, antiques and collectables, and so much more.

But this step is crucial when you’re trying to stay organized, and especially if you are downsizing your home size.

A friend of mine suggested getting rid of everything you definitely don’t need and then put everything you don’t use at least once a week into boxes in your garage or shed.

If you find you need it at any point then go out and bring it in. But what’s left in the garage after a few months can be gotten rid of. (Getting rid of things in GR? Check out where to bring them)

Of course, there are some exceptions to this rule. For me, it’s my canning supplies. I only use these a few months out of the year, but I’m a pretty hardcore food preserver, so when I use them I use them a lot.And it doesn’t make sense for me to get rid of these items because they are expensive, I do utilize them, and they are something I couldn’t borrow when I needed them because my friends would be using them at the same time I would need to.

 

Organizing the Leftovers

Once I had gotten rid of a large amount of our possessions it was time to start organizing.

If you have a hard time organizing I encourage you to check out Fly Lady or have a friend come over and give you a hand.

When looking at buying furniture and storage items to replace those that no longer fit in a smaller home, think about items that can be multifunctional.

An excellent example of a piece of furniture we own I have found to be very multifunctional is this large wicker trunk I bought eight years ago from Pier 1 Imports. I find it funny because at the time when we purchased it my husband believed it was a big waste of money, but now agrees it was a great investment.

Honestly, this was at a point in our lives where we were living above our means, but this was one purchase we made that I do not regret. I have used it to store our linens, board games, scrapbooks, and other items over the years. It also functions as a coffee table and right now our guinea pig cage sits on top of it.

 

Create Space

One great way to create space is buying utilizing every little bit of space you can. Instead of a couch we opted for a nice, used, high end futon. I can store things underneath it in baskets and it also serves as a guest bed. By utilizing this extra space I am keeping my home clean and organized.

downsizing your home

photo credit: bluishorange

Find A Place

Everything must have a place.

No exceptions.

If you can’t find a place to put it then it’s time to revert to the paragraph above when I talk about getting rid of stuff. It is not possible to keep more items than your house can hold, well at least not if you want to keep your home clean and tidy!

You must learn to love baskets. Baskets are your friends. Embrace them. Utilize them. Love them.

Seriously, I am not generally a hoarder, but when it comes to baskets and quilts I may have a bit of a problem. Just kidding…..sort of. However, if you’re going to “hoard” something at least baskets are a practical thing to hoard and I use them for everything. We store our candles, books, homeschool supplies, yarn, fabric, magazines, toys, and just about anything you can imagine in baskets.

When you live in a small home even a little mess can look big. I organized all my kid’s toys in baskets and they can get out one basket at a time. In order to get out another basket they must first take care of the items from the first basket. This is an easy way to keep things organized and picked up.

The hardest part about downsizing was getting rid of things that I enjoyed. I had a beautiful collection of depression glass, which I sold the vast majority of, even though I had been collecting these dishes for over ten years. There were many other things I had to say goodbye to as well.

It was hard to leave our beautiful home and move into a mobile home.

I had a lot of anxiety and stress to deal with, but we made it through. I know this sacrifice will pay off in the long run and I do look forward to the day when I will be handed the keys to a house again.

In the meantime, we are enjoying this season of less stuff.

 

Have you downsized your home or possessions? How did you do it, and what was the hardest part?

 

Mel has a Bachelors Degree in Business Management from Cornerstone University and is just about finished with a Family Herbalist Certification from Vintage Remedies. She enjoys studying nutrition and herbs in her spare time. As a stay-at-home mother of two she spends her days reading, homeschooling, cleaning, and cooking nutritious meals. Eventually her and her husband hope to buy a property to homestead.

 



All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

This blog is for educational purposes only. The information provided by Donielle, or any contributor, is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you are seeking medical advice, please search out a qualified health practitioner.

Rubbery Celery

I’m really good about buying celery cause I know how healthy it is and I figure I’ll eat it for snacks and all. Problem is, a lot of times I don’t eat it. I get lazy and don’t feel like cutting it and washing it, in order to have a snack. Or it gets pushed to the back of the fridge to be forgotten in the land of mystery foods.

It sits in the crisper and I pay no attention to it for a week or so, and then I try to eat it before it goes bad. Unfortunately it’s usually gone rubbery and no fun to eat. Then I came across an idea (can’t remember where) to cut the stems off at the bottom and place them in a tall bowl or pitcher, put a couple of inches of water in the bottom, and stick it in the fridge for a couple of hours.

You’ll end up with celery as good as new and no need to send it out to the compost pile.


Homemade crackers are easier than they may seem to be! Crackers are often used as quick snacks for small children; they’re easy, they’re compact, and easy to bring along while traveling. But most pre-made crackers contain added preservatives, to much salt, and even excess sugar.

Homemade Baby Wipes

One of the expenses that go along with diapering, is the wipes. And the wipes you find in the stores are often irritating to little bums, so making your own is not only inexpensive, but better for your baby’s toosh.

Ingredients

  • 1 Bounty big roll – white, no dyes (I’ve found the natural paper towels fall apart)
  • 1 Tbsp natural baby bath (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp oil – olive, sunflower, jojoba
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water

Method of Preparation

1. Lay paper towel on it’s side and cut in half. Do NOT use a serrated knife. *ahem* I thought this would work better and all it does is shred the paper towel. Use a sharp knife with a straight edge.

2. Take out cardboard tube and discard it.

3. Put the rest of the ingredients in a container with a good sealing lid.

4. Place paper towel in container of liquid and turn upside down to soak through. Pull ‘wipes’ from center of roll.

You can also use the wipe solution for reusable wipes! Just place the fabric wipes in a container and cover with enough solution to soak but not completely saturate the wipes.

Do you use a natural or homemade wipe solution? If so, what do you put in it?

How to Start Cloth Diapering

drying diapers

photo credit: photoann

 

My biggest issue when I was trying to decided whether or not to cloth diaper, was where to start! I think most people have the same thoughts when it comes to it:

  1. The ick factor. I knew cloth diapering was better for the environment, better for baby’s bum, and better on my wallet. But the memory of my own mom dunking and swishing poopy diapers out in the toilet (plus the nasty smelling ‘wet pail’) totally turned me off to it. Totally. Plus, how in the world do you wash them?
  2. So many options, and everyone seems to have their very own ( and very different) opinion.
  3. The upfront costs of cloth diapers makes just about anyone run scared. And frugal ‘ol me was having a hard time wrapping my head around it! Plus, it’s a big enough purchase that I didn’t want to buy the ‘wrong’ ones.

So let’s debunk a few things and chat about how to make it work!

1. The Ick Factor

Yes, there will be ick. I won’t lie to you.

But.

Did you know that disposable diaper manufacturers also tell you to dump the solid wastes? Go ahead and look on the package, it’s there.

The actual changing with cloth diapers is no different than with disposables. And if you use cloth wipes, it makes it super easy because the wipe and dipe get tossed into the same pail. But it’s what to do after the fact that had me stumped. Well….. if the baby is exclusively breastfed, unless it is a super huge mess, you don’t have to rinse it off. Just toss the dipe in a dry pail that’s been fitted with a wet bag (got that? no more wet pail – you just have a diaper liner in either a garbage can or diaper pail). Done.

If your little one is on solids of some sort, one of two things might happen depending on how they go. You’ll just shake it a bit into the toilet or take a diaper sprayer (cost to buy one is about $40.00, cost to make your own about $5.00) and spray it off. Then drop it in the pail.

You should wash every other day as the ammonia can build up and cause the pail to get quite rank. And it can have an effect on the elastic within the dipes. What you do is take the whole bag of diapers, turn it inside out into the washing machine (you never touch the dipes!) and toss the wet bag in too.

  • Wash on cold for one short cycle with a small amount of detergent- helps to rid the diapers of any solid matter left over
  • Wash on HOT for a long cycle with a small amount of detergent- cleans and deodorizes
  • Rinse one final time – helps rid the diapers of any leftover detergent
  • Dry according to diaper directions or dry outside to “sun” the stains out

After cloth diapering my son from 20 months old until he was completely without diapers (about 10 months later) and now after having my daughter in cloth full time for two years and nights/naps for the last few months, I now realize it’s not near as icky as I thought it would be. And the extra washing isn’t a big deal either, though it took me a couple months to get a good system down so that I wasn’t running out of diapers!

2. The Options

Prefolds, pockets, one size, all in ones, fitteds, velcro, snaps…….ahhhh! So many options out there, where do you even begin to start! To make it easier, many cloth diaper companies are now offering a diaper trial.where they send you a few diapers to try and then you send them back after you use them for a couple of weeks. This way you get to really see how they work without a lot of upfront cost.

You could also buy a few different types to try them out. My experience has been that they all work – it’s just a matter of personal preference. And the great thing is about cloth diapers is that if you take good care of them and keep them in good shape, they are easy to resell! I’ve purchased many used diapers at half the price and they work just as good.

My advice is to just start! You don’t need to have all the supplies, and 24 diapers all at once. But a few and use them while you supplement with disposables until you find out what you really like to use. I started out with 3 diapers and now have built up a stash of about 14. (though I would highly recommend about 24 – you’d do laundry less and also not run out as often as I forget to wash!)

3. The Cost

Yes, cloth diapers are expensive. Spending $15.00 to $20.00 per diaper seems like way to much! There are cheaper options like prefolds (but remember you have to buy different sizes as the baby grows) but even that it still just less than $100.00 to buy what you need all at once. So what do you do if you want to try cloth but can’t afford the upfront cost?

Ways to buy diapers frugally:

  • The Cloth Diaper Foundation offers scholarships for cloth diapers that you can use for a few months until you build up a suplly of your own. {free of charge}
  • Buy used through a site like Diaper Swappers or craigslist
  • Check Cotton Babies for ‘seconds’ (dipes with slight blemishes but completely usable)
  • Sites like etsy and ebay have sellers who make their own diapers and many are great quality and cheaper than name brand (just check out their reviews!)
  • Cloth Diaper Clearance is also a great site to check out

Cloth diapering is an economical and ecological solution to diapering. Not only do you save about $2000.00 for the first child that uses them (second child it’s basically free if your dipes are still in usable condition, as most would be) you save the landfills from about 1 ton of diapers per child. And those diapers will take about 500 years to decompose. Not that’s really the ick factor!


Do you cloth diaper? How did you get started?

If you don’t what’s stopping you?

 

 

4/2/2010

 



All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

This blog is for educational purposes only. The information provided by Donielle, or any contributor, is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you are seeking medical advice, please search out a qualified health practitioner.

A Case for Cloth Diapers

{the benefits of cloth diapering are numerous and the following is a guest post from my friend Kelly to help explain how numerous they really are.}


If you are currently expecting, or you are already a parent, you may have contemplated cloth diapers.

It is a wise choice to think about the diaper you will use for your little one, because they will sit in them 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for an average of 3 years.

A wise choice to ponder because you will pay for every diaper you put on baby, and you will use an average of 7000 to 9000 from birth to potty!

There are so many reasons why parents choose to use cloth, and on the other end…so many reasons why they choose not to!

When researching cloth diapers as an option you will come across a wealth of information (and opinions) that can seem overwhelming. I know that when my husband and I sat down to look through the info on cloth diapering we were so bombarded that we thought of giving up on the idea all together. In fact, I found myself doubting that the statics I was reading were true because they seemed so astronomical to me.

I’ll draw for you a broad outline in the way of research and only point out facts I have personally checked – please when researching on your own, check the sources of the studies, a study is only as reliable as who is paying for it. For example, if you find a study leading you to believe that the environmental impact of reusable diapers is not more or is equal to the impact of disposables, and then you read that the study was conducted by, and paid for, by a large disposable diaper manufacturer then take that into account. Vice Versa with a cloth diaper company paying for a study – check your sources and be an educated consumer. My sources are located at the end of this article and have been checked against numerous others for merit.

Broadly spoken, there are three main benefits to cloth diapering; benefits to baby, benefit on the family budget, and finally the most obvious is the benefit environmentally.

Benefits to Baby

As I stated previously, baby will spend the vast majority of 3 years in a diaper. Our skin is like a screen door into our body, things go out and things go in. Moisturized, warm skin acts even more as a “loose” barrier. Disposable diapers contain chemicals as well called SAP (super absorbent polymers). Also amongst the chemicals in a disposable diaper are sodium polyacrylate (the chemical that was banned from tampons in the 1980’s due to its link to toxic shock syndrome) and dioxin (a carcinogen). Because there are harsh chemicals present with disposables they are sometimes not well tolerated by baby’s sensitive skin. There are other studies being conducted looking into the link between SAP and asthma-like symptoms.

Benefits on the Family Budget

There is no doubt that it is more convenient to use something and then throw it away rather than launder it to be used again. However, we as a family had to decide whether the convenience factor of disposables was worth the $2000 more we would end up paying for it, (not to mention the environmental impact it would have). My husband works in finance and money, and how we chose to spend it is of large importance to him. He sat down and worked out the following the image. cost analysis.jpgThis is a very liberal estimation of needs for a cloth diaperer. Cloth diapering can be done much less expensively than this, but to play it really cautious we went as pricey as possible so that the savings were achievable for all, no matter what system of diapering you pick. The savings alone spoke volumes to our family and really made a difference for us. Also, we considered that this is savings for one child… so obviously for subsequent children the savings doubles and triples and so on.

Benefits to the Environment

The home run came when we realized that the environmental benefits of cloth diapering were astronomical!

Research shows that it will take a disposable diaper from 200 to 500 years to decompose – this even includes the brands that are more “environmentally friendly”. This means that the first single-use diaper ever made and used is still sitting in a landfill somewhere just as “ripe” as the day it was changed. 2.7 billion disposables enter our landfills each year and it makes them the 3rd largest consumer product in landfills to date – and of the three they are the least likely to decompose.

I was recently at an Earth Day Awareness Event and was having a discussion with a man about cloth diapering. Something he said to me struck a chord; he said, “ so basically we (the majority of society that use disposables) are wrapping something that is very biodegradable (poop) in something that will never biodegrade (single-use diapers) and throwing it in a landfill.” Honestly, the idea had often crossed my mind as to how unsanitary it seemed to me that the majority of disposable diaper users (myself included up until recent years) took off a diaper full of poop and rolled it up into a little paper and plastic poop ball, put it in a diaper genie containing a loooooong plastic bag that sealed it and then took it to the curb for the trash every week. I think that if I had sat down and thought that through a bit, at the time it would have seemed appalling to me that I was doing it.


I liken it to smoking in the 1960’s, a ton of people did it, and no one really thought that it was bad for you…just didn’t really sit down and think about it. I often get asked about the environmental footprint created by laundering cloth diapers. There are many studies that have been done on this subject. My overall summary is this, when you launder at home, with an all-natural detergent the environmental impact is minute compared to the impact of the disposable diapering manufacturers. The average number of disposable diapers a child would wear from birth to potty would require 20 trees, 60 lbs of chlorine, 420 gallons of petroleum, and would generate 1 ton of solid trash that would enter a landfill.

The job of a parent is the hardest one out there, and there are many reasons why cloth diapering is not for everyone – I am the first to understand that. However, if cloth diapering can work for you it is worth giving it a shot, even on a here and there basis, to cut down on your baby’s carbon footprint.

Happy Diapering!



What about you? Have you thought about using cloth diapers?

If you do, what was your main reason?


Sources:

“The Poop on Eco-Friendly diapers” (http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,63182,00.html)

“Chemicals in Diapers Cited as Possible Asthma Trigger” (http://www.intelihealth.com/pcn/general/00245145.html) http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1510/is_n60/ai_6642692

“Country in „true‟ energy crises ups prices” http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2008-05-28- 1430029404_x.htm

“First Steps, The Diaper Debate” (http://healthychild.org/blog/comments/first_steps_the_diaper_deb ate/) Pamela Lundquist.



All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

This blog is for educational purposes only. The information provided by Donielle, or any contributor, is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you are seeking medical advice, please search out a qualified health practitioner.

Learning Herbs Workshop {west MI}

I know this is really last minute, but thought you local mommas may want to know that our local Weston A Price chapter, Nourishing Ways, is having a “Learning Herbs” workshop tomorrow from 1-3pm.

Does your yard have what you need in a medical emergency?  Rediscover how our ancestors used their environment to heal and unlock these secrets for your family. Laurie Tanis will take you on a guided tour of her yard and woods to point out beneficial species and how to use them. You will learn how to make salad, tea, tincture and salve.

I’m excited to go and expand my knowledge on herbs and how to find them in my own backyard! To find out more, and to sign up – visit the Nourishing Ways Meetup page.



All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

This blog is for educational purposes only. The information provided by Donielle, or any contributor, is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you are seeking medical advice, please search out a qualified health practitioner.

Sweet Deals for West Mi Mamas And The Monkies They Love

At the beginning of this month, I launched a local alternative to daily deal sites like Groupon or Living Social that will be focused on West Michigan Moms and kids.  My goal is to connect local families with businesses that they’ll love by offering amazing deals!

 

Wouldn’t it be awesome to pay $30 for someone to come clean your house?

 

Or

 

A screamin deal for a family photo shoot and beautiful pictures to hang on your walls?

 

What about…

 

Half off your favorite restaurant for a cheap date night?

 

We’re working on deals like these as well as sweet deals on

dance classes, karate, fitness, salons, activities and so much more!

 

We’ll be taking suggestions too!

So let me know what you’d like to see.

 

To get the scoop on these fabulous deals sign up at

WestMichigan.DealMoms.com

Oh, and come find me on Facebook too

 

West Michigan Link-Up

Natural Living Moms and Eat Local West Michigan will be hosting a weekly link-up every Thursday. So if you blog about local businesses, deals, etc, etc, please feel free to link up below!

*Linky closes one week from today. So if you have other posts coming up in your blog schedule you’d like to link, feel free!

But before you do, let’s cover the ground rules. Unfortunately link ups such as this are getting watered down with stagnant traffic. In order to make sure this doesn’t happen please make sure you:

  1. Link to a specific, recent post relevant to the West Michigan area. This can include things like reviews, general discussion, tips on buying locally, events, etc.
  2. Link not to your homepage, but directly to your post.
  3. Make sure to include a link to this post! Collaborating with bloggers is a two-way street, we’re showing links to your site, make sure you link to this post and let your readers know what it’s about. (or simply copy and paste this at the bottom of your post: What to find out more about what’s going on locally? This post is linked to the West Michigan Link-Up at Natural Living Moms, where you can see what everyone else is up to!)
  4. Please publish your post with the above mentioned link to NLM. So going back in every once in a while and adding it isn’t a major cause for concern, but y’all…….then the link to NLM never hits your subscribers.
  5. Not mandatory, but if you’re looking to help increase the traffic for us local bloggers, read the other posts and share then via social media and sites like stumble upon. That’s just good blog kharma that will come back ten fold. :-)

Enter away!